size

size n Size, dimensions, area, extent, magnitude, volume are here compared primarily as terms meaning the amount of space occupied or sometimes of time or energy used by a thing and determinable by measuring.
Size usually refers to things having length, width, and depth or height; it need not imply accurate mathematical measurements but may suggest a mere estimate of these
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the size of this box is 10 inches long, 8 inches wide, and 5 inches deep

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these trees are not the right size

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what is the size of the room?

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that exceptional mushroom, skull-like in its proportions and bold in sizeMailer

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Size is also referable to things which cannot be measured in themselves, but can be computed in terms of the number of individuals which comprise them or the amount of space occupied by those individuals
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the mere complexity and size of a modern state is against the identification of the man with the citizen— Dickinson

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Since dimension means measurement in a single direction (as the line of length, or breadth, or depth) the plural dimensions, used collectively, is a close synonym of size; in contrast, however, it usually implies accurate measurements that are known or specified
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the window frames must be exactly alike in dimensions

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the dimensions of the universe are not calculable

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the dimensions of the lot are 75 by 100 feet

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no reliable calipers exist long enough to stretch into the next century and measure the dimensions of greatness— Fadiman

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Area is referable only to things measurable in the two dimensions length and breadth. It is used of plane figures or of plane surfaces (as the ground, a floor, or an arena) and is computed in square measure
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the estate is 200 acres in area

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the forest fire covered an area of ten square miles

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the area of a rectangle is computed by multiplying its length by its breadth

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the major areas of the world are in the throes of revolutionary social change— Geismar

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Extent is referable chiefly to things that are measured in one dimension; it may be the length or the breadth, but it is usually thought of as the length
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the driveway's extent is 100 feet

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the wings of the airplane are 75 feet in extent

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However it is often used as though it were the equivalent of area
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the basement of St. Katherine's Dock House is vast in extent and confusing in its plan— Conrad

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the reports . . . constantly express amazement at the extent and severity of Russian attacks and counterattacks— Shirer

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The word is also referable to measured time or to space measured in terms of time; thus, the duration of a thing is the extent of its existence
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few lives reach the extent of one hundred years

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Germany was ... a nine days' march from north to south, and of incalculable extent from west to east— Buchan

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Magnitude, largely a mathematical and technical term, may be used in reference to size or two-dimensional extent
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a queer little isolated point in time, with no magnitude, but only position— Rose Macaulay

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It may be used also in reference to something measurable whose exact quantity, extent, or degree may be expressed in mathematical figures; thus, the magnitude of a star is indicated by a number that expresses its relative brightness
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an alpha particle bearing a positive charge equal in magnitude to twice the electron charge— Darrow

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the magnitude of the structure as a whole and the massive nature of its details are never obtrusive— O. S. Nock

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Volume (see also BULK) is also a technical term; it is used in reference to something that can be measured or considered in terms of cubic measurements; thus, the volume of a solid cylinder is equal to the cubic measure of air it displaces, and that of a hollow one, to the cubic measure of its capacity; two objects that are equal in volume may differ greatly in weight; when a thing expands, it increases in volume
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we could readily store a million times as many stars in the present volume of the system— B. J. Bok

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you may say that the waves ... are not like real waves; but they move, they have force and volumeBinyon

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Analogous words: amplitude, *expanse, spread, stretch: *bulk, mass, volume

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Size — Size, n. [Abbrev. from assize. See {Assize}, and cf. {Size} glue.] 1. A settled quantity or allowance. See {Assize}. [Obs.] To scant my sizes. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. (Univ. of Cambridge, Eng.) An allowance of food and drink from the buttery,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Size — Size, v. t. 1. To fix the standard of. To size weights and measures. [R.] Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. To adjust or arrange according to size or bulk. Specifically: (a) (Mil.) To take the height of men, in order to place them in the ranks according… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Size — Size, v. i. 1. To take greater size; to increase in size. [1913 Webster] Our desires give them fashion, and so, As they wax lesser, fall, as they size, grow. Donne. [1913 Webster] 2. (Univ. of Cambridge, Eng.) To order food or drink from the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Size — Size, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sized}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sizing}.] To cover with size; to prepare with size. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Size — Size, n. [OIt. sisa glue used by painters, shortened fr. assisa, fr. assidere, p. p. assiso, to make to sit, to seat, to place, L. assidere to sit down; ad + sidere to sit down, akin to sedere to sit. See {Sit}, v. i., and cf. {Assize}, {Size}… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Size — Size, n. [See {Sice}, and {Sise}.] Six. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • size — I. noun Etymology: Middle English sise assize, from Anglo French, short for assise more at assize Date: 13th century 1. dialect British assize 2a usually used in plural 2. obsolete a fixed portion of food or drink 3. a. physical magnitude, extent …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Size — The word size may refer to how big something is. In particular: * Measurement * Dimensions: length, width, height, diameter, perimeter, area, volume * Clothing sizes such as shoe size or dress size * Body dimensions **Human height **Human weight… …   Wikipedia

  • Size 14 — Infobox musical artist Name = Size 14 Img capt = Img size = 175 Landscape = Background = group or band Alias = Origin = Hollywood, California,USA Genre = Alternative rock, Indie rock Years active = 1996 1998 Label = Volcano Records Associated… …   Wikipedia

  • size — Assize As*size , n. [OE. assise, asise, OF. assise, F. assises, assembly of judges, the decree pronounced by them, tax, impost, fr. assis, assise, p. p. of asseoir, fr. L. assid?re to sit by; ad + sed[=e]re to sit. See {Sit}, {Size}, and cf.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • size up — transitive verb Date: 1884 to form a judgment of < size up the situation > …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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